Can you buy a book for me?

To answer this question, I wanted to share a little bit about library theory and policy.

STILL READING?  Good, that means I haven’t lost you.    I rely on various types of data when I decide what books to buy: I look at how often similar books are checked out (circulation statistics), Reviews by other librarians (in a publication such as Booklist), or patron requests, which is where you come in.  If there’s a book you’d like to buy so you can check it out of the library, let me know!  I want to buy material that people will read.

Next, I make sure a book meets our collection development policy.  This is like a manual that the library has adopted to guide our selections based on the population of the town, and size and budget of the library.  I make sure the books meet the guidelines of the policy.   For example: since Allenstown is in New Hampshire, I’m likely to buy books about wildlife native to New Hampshire.  However, I may not be so likely to buy books about snakes in California (I’ll leave that up to the library in California).

So in short, yes, I might buy a book for you.  Just let me know what it is and I can let you know if it fits the policy.  Or you can check out the policy and make me an argument.  Come on in and give me your request in person, email me at allenstownlib@comcast.net or call me at 485-7651.  Or leave a comment below…

New Internet Use Policy begins today

On September 14, 2012, the trustees of the Allenstown Public Library approved a new Internet Use Policy.  All individuals who wish to use the public access computers to access the internet will be asked to read and sign the policy.  Parents/guardians of minors will be asked to sign the contract for their child, and the child will be asked to sign the minor contract.

This new policy details what behavior is expected when individuals use the internet, as well as appropriate material that can be accessed on the public terminals.  You can read the policy by clicking on the Internet Use Policy tab above.

Questions?  Feel free to call the library.

Allenstown or Suncook?

I receive the question often, so I did some research into it.  Here’s what I found.

Suncook is a census designated place (CDP).  That means that when the government collects census data each year, they combine Allenstown and Pembroke, when collecting information.  They do this because Suncook resembles a town, even though it doesn’t have its own government.

Allenstown is a town.  That means that it is “a center of population.”  It also means that unlike Suncook, it has a town government.

While I can’t substantiate this data, I believe that the post office uses Suncook because of its status as a CDP by the federal government, and the post office is regulated by the federal government.